Talents Tips – Create a SmartArt graphic

By Peter Talent

Peter will be leading Become a Proficient MS Office 2010 User from Tuesday 2 February – for more information click here http://goo.gl/w8L9kV

A SmartArt graphic is a visual representation of your information that you can quickly and easily create, choosing from among many different layouts, to effectively communicate your message or ideas. You can create SmartArt graphics in

Talents Tips January image 1

You can create a SmartArt graphic in Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Word. Although you cannot create in most other Office 2010 programs, (e.g. Access, Project) you can copy and paste SmartArt graphics as images into those programs.

Some layouts for SmartArt graphics contain a fixed number of shapes. For example, the Opposing Arrows layout in the Relationship type is designed to show two opposing ideas or concepts. Only two shapes can correspond to text, and the layout cannot be changed to display more ideas or concepts.

Talents Tips January Image 2

Create a SmartArt graphic and add text to it

On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click SmartArt.

Talents Tips January image 3PNG

An example of the Illustration group on the Insert tab, in PowerPoint 2010

  1. In the Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box, click the type and layout that you want.
  2. Enter your text by doing one of the following:

v Click [Text] in the Text pane, and then type your text.

v Copy text from another location or program, click [Text] in the Text pane, and then paste your text.

Notes

  • If the Text pane is not visible, click the control.
  • Talents Tips January Image 4
  • To add text in an arbitrary position close to or on top of your SmartArt graphic, on the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Text Box to insert a text box. If you want only the text in your text box to appear, right-click your text box, click Format Shape or Format Text Box, and then set the text box to have no background colour and no border.
  • Click in a box in the SmartArt graphic, and then type your text. For best results, use this option after you add all of the boxes that you want.

An Example of SmartArt

Law acts through the ages

Talents Tips January Image 5

Talents Tips January Image 6

 

BBC News: What’s the best way to fight memory loss?

Now science is proving what we have suspected all along, that drawing is not only enjoyable but good for you as well. A study sponsored by the BBC series Trust Me, I’m a Doctor concluded that in terms of improving memory, the adult participants who engaged in a life-drawing class had better outcomes than groups who only indulged in physical exercise or brain-exercising puzzles. The act of scrutinising an object and then putting pen to paper to re-create the object develops the psychomotor skills that kick start the brain no matter what age you are. In addition, the study group reported that the social aspect of drawing amongst a group was beneficial to their state of mind as well. At Continuing Education, we know how much our students have enjoyed recent drawing courses. This year we have two 8-week drawing courses, Adventures in Drawing, an afternoon course in the Autumn term and The Human Body in Art, an evening course in Spring. Our popular and very qualified drawing tutor will help you explore your creative drive and develop those crucial psychomotor skills, whether you are drawing an outdoor view of Liverpool or a life model in the classroom.

BBC – best way to fight memory loss

Anti-Art by Ed Bruce

 DSCF0120

It’s interesting, but is it art?’ A familiar question, often heard being asked loudly in art galleries. But who is in charge of deciding what is art and what is not? Is there a council, an academy? Do we ‘know’ the rules of art, and if something doesn’t fit the art category can we definitely say it isn’t art? Throughout the history of art there certainly were attempts to formalise art and write a set of rules, for example the Royal Academy under Joshua Reynolds. Academic painting dominated the 19th century, but when the rules of art were broken by artists whose work did not conform, the French Academy of Fine Arts held a Salon of the Rejected to show how correct the Academy was in not accepting these ‘inferior’ paintings. These ‘Impressionists’, as they became known, cared about art, not ‘Art’ and begun a revolution that is still felt today.

The Art Historian E.H. Gombrich wrote that ‘there really is no such thing as Art. There are only artists’. This acknowledges that artists always need a bit of breathing space in which to make work. To have a strict notion of Art stifles creativity. Consequently, artists have always sought to invent new ways to depict the world by breaking away from the hackneyed notions of ‘orthodox’ Art. There is always an impulse to break the accepted rules, to make anti-Art.

orange-chalk-polkasmorgue

I will be teaching a five week course that will explore this urge as experienced by artists during the 20th century. The early part of the period is often seen as a golden age of experimentation: Dada, Surrealism, Primitivism and Art Brut all began as a challenge to the staid conventions of the time. At an aviation fair in Paris, artists Marcel Duchamp and Constantin Brancusi discussed ‘what art could be’ in the future.

Painting is finished. Who can do anything better than this propeller? Can you?” asked Duchamp. Could engineered objects be art if the artist declared they were? Brancusi later discovered that one of his sculptures (Bird in Space) had been declared ‘not art’ on its way through US customs and therefore subject to import duties as a machine-part. Duchamp imagined the scenario where one could display a machine-made object in an art gallery and in 1917 submitted a urinal entitled Fountain to an art exhibition in New York.

Dada, one of the most important art movements of the 20th Century, emerged during the chaos of the First World War. It employed shock tactics in its refusal to conform to the conventions of the Art establishment. After the Second World War, Jean Dubuffet turned to children’s drawings to inspire what he called his ‘raw art’. The anti-Art impulse continued throughout the Modern period, through Pop, Fluxus and Happenings, and is still with us today of course – in the works of Mike Kelly, Sarah Lucas, Martin Creed and many others who kick against art with a capital A.

Ed Bruce will be teaching Anti-Art a five week course beginning on the 5 of October, 6-8pm. If you would like to book on this course you can do so by clicking here Anti-Art

Searching for Richard III

richard_III_A

The skeleton found beneath a Leicester car park in 2012 is beyond reasonable doubt that of King Richard III. One of the most controversial of English rulers, Richard has continued to fascinate ever since his death in battle at Bosworth in 1485, provoking numerous literary and artistic portrayals as a ruthless murderer of princes and devious plotter with unstoppable ambition. The legacy of this long tradition is the indelible image of Richard III as a disfigured hunchback, malign in appearance and in character.

This autumn, Continuing Education researchers in the Archaeology, Art History, English and History departments join the search for the real Richard III in a series of linked evening lectures. These talks will investigate the scientific and historic evidence that helps us to understand how this picture of the king was formed and will enable us to better judge how accurate the picture might be. If you choose to attend all four Richard III lectures then you will pay the discounted rate of £30.

Richard III: reign and reputation
Lecture: Monday 14 October 6.15 – 8pm, University of Liverpool
With Dr Martin Heale
£8
This lecture will assess the brief reign of Richard III and consider how historians have sought to understand and evaluate this most controversial – and topical – of English kings.
CRN 17617

Life in the age of Richard III: a bioarchaeological perspective
Lecture: Monday 28 October 6.15 – 8pm, University of Liverpool
With Shirley Curtis-Summers
£8
Using scientific evidence from the skeletal remains of Richard III, this lecture will build a picture of past lifeways in the middle ages. Key case studies will be presented in bioarchaeology (how we identify and recreate evidence of diet, health, trauma and pathology). We will analyse the skeletal trauma from Richard III and the Battle of Towton skeletons, investigate monastic dieting and fasting practices, and consider diet and disease from the medieval perspective.
Note that images of human remains will be shown in this lecture.
CRN 18025

Richard III: Shakespeare’s villain
Lecture: Monday 11 November 6.15 – 8pm, University of Liverpool
With Andrea Young
£8
As part of our Searching for Richard III series, this session will explore the historical, literary and dramatic influences on which Shakespeare drew to create one of his greatest anti-heroes.
CRN 17885

Richard III: Portraying the King
Lecture: Monday 25 November 6.15 – 8pm, University of Liverpool
With Dr Suzanne May
£8
One of the Walker Art Gallery’s most important paintings is ‘David Garrick as Richard III’. This lecture tells how William Hogarth’s 1745 portrait reconciles Shakespearean historicism and dramatic licence with artistic ambition and celebrity portraiture.
CRN 15667

For more information on Continuing Education please visit www.liv.ac.uk/conted/