The 6th Annual Archaeology and the Bible Conference

The 6th Annual Archaeology and the Bible Conference,

Saturday 25th March, 2017

Archaeology and the Bible’s first five books

The Lecture Theatre, Department of Continuing Education, 126 Mount Pleasant, L69 3GR

The Bible’s first five books, sometimes called the Torah or Pentateuch, tell the story of Israel’s origins and its place in the wider Ancient World. But can this story be illuminated, even authenticated by the archaeological evidence?

10.00 – 10.30 Dr. Paul Lawrence (University of Liverpool): In the beginning … in a coffin in Egypt – some observations about the structure of the Book of Genesis

In the beginning …”, so begins the Bible’s first book. It is an apt title for a book that outlines the Hebrew worldview of the origins of the universe, mankind, sin and death, the nations and the nation of Israel. Does the book of Genesis have a clearly evident structure and does this give clues to the book’s composition or compilation? What evidence is there for it accurately representing events of the early Second Millennium BC?

10.30 – 11.00 Dr. James Patrick (University of Oxford): Interpreting the Creation Week in its Ancient Context

The creation of the world over a seven-day period in Genesis 1:1–2:4 has been interpreted in many different ways, particularly since the time of Darwin.  But how was this precise timing interpreted by its first hearers?  This lecture will consider evidence from ancient Israelite culture and the wider ancient Near Eastern context, in order to come closer to the original intention of this passage and its theological message.

11.00-11.30 break

11.30-12.30 Dr. James Hoffmeier (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School):Moses and Akhenaten

Akhenaten (1353-1336 B.C.) is thought by many scholars to be the first monotheist in history.  Moses is believed to have lived in the following century, which naturally has raised the question, did Akhenaten’s religious revolution surrounding the solar deity, Aten, have any influence on the development of Israel’s religion? This lecture will examine the evidence for Akhenaten’s religion and its unique elements, followed by the an investigation of the possible connection between Moses and Akhenaten.

12.30-13.30 lunch

13.30-14.30  Dr. James Hoffmeier: Israel’s Earliest Sanctuary, Priestly Garments and Bejewelled Breastplate in the Book of Exodus in the Light of Archaeological Data

One of the most compelling arguments for the historicity of the Hebrew sojourn in Egypt is the imprint that Egyptian language, culture, and religion left on early Israel. This lecture will examine some this evidence as it relates to Israelite religion that demonstrates strong Egyptian connections that most likely can be traced to the centuries the Hebrews lived in Egypt before the exodus.

14.30-15.00 break

15.00 -15.30 Alistair Dickey (Ph.D candidate University of Liverpool): Semites in Ancient Egypt “So Jacob and all his offspring went to Egypt, taking with them their livestock and the possessions they had acquired in Canaan.”

This account in Genesis 46 describes Jacob and his family moving house to Egypt.  However, is such an account plausible?  What do we know of Semites in Egypt during the Second Millennium BC?  This presentation will explore some of the archaeological and textual evidence from the Delta in the north to Thebes in the south that sheds light on the situation.

15.30-16.15 Emeritus Professor Alan Millard (University of Liverpool): Babylonian and Hebrew Law 

Similarities and differencesGod gave the ‘Laws of Moses’ to Israel at Mount Sinai, according to the Book of Exodus, with the Ten Commandments, at least, written on stone tablets. Israel’s laws are not unique. Babylonian laws have been discovered and some of them are very similar to some of the Mosaic laws, but there are also major differences. The lecture will compare those, showing how the Hebrew laws are distinctive.

16.15-16.30 Questions to the speakers and closing remarks

Advance registration £27 includes a sandwich lunch. If you would like to book on this event you can do so by clicking here 

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